The Fish


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Rainbow Trout

Few fish species are passionately pursued by so many, and the wild Alaskan rainbow trout represents so much. They are hungry, explosive, moody, challenging, elusive and beautiful. Relative to the size and remoteness of our watershed, this experience may very well challenge some of the best rainbow trout waters in Alaska – and it just doesn’t get any better than watching these trout slam top water mice patterns!

The rainbow trout in this watershed range from 12 – 28 inches, with the average fish around 18+ inches, good numbers of trout in the 20 – 24 inch range, and 26+ inches possible. Fish are consistently taken on top-water mice patterns and streamers throughout the season. Large dry flies and nymph action is fairly reliable prior to the salmon runs. Eggs imitations, of course, are productive as well.

Don’t let the lure of a “30 incher” prevent you from experiencing this truly incredible Alaska trout fishing… Yes they are out there, but they certainly aren’t as common as most places want you to believe!

  • Rod

    7 weight rod with medium-fast to fast action
  • Reel

    Durable reels with medium to strong disc drag and 150 yards of 20 pound backing
  • Line

    A floating line works well in most all conditions
  • Leader

    8 - 12 pound

Arctic Grayling

If you want to catch wild Alaskan fish on dry flies literally all day long, the grayling are impossible to beat. These voracious eaters are also opportunistic and aggressive on nymphs, streamers, egg patterns and this is the only place in Alaska we have consistently taken grayling on mice patterns. Yes, they are that hungry! And, yes, sometimes they can’t get their mouth around the giant lemming patterns we love to throw.

In this watershed the grayling range from 10 – 20 inches, average about 14 inches, and are sure to put a smile on your face with light tackle.

  • Rod

    4 to 5 weight rods with soft to medium-fast action
  • Reel

    Quality reel to match rod
  • Line

    A floating line is all you need
  • Leader

    6 to 8 pound

Dolly Varden

Once the salmon show up in good numbers, big numbers of dollies follow them up river and stage just downstream of the spawning behemoths, who can individually drop thousands of eggs in the stream.

The dollies are voracious, hard hitting and feed aggressively on salmon egg imitations, as well as streamers. Once hooked, often during egg-induced feeding frenzies, the dollies are surprisingly tenacious fighters – they just don’t ever seem to give up – and can definitely put a good bend in a fly rod and a smile on your face.

Fish of this type range from 12 – 24 inches and average 18 inches.  Some days, skating flies across the top of the water can produce violent and prolific numbers of strikes!

  • Rod

    5 to 6 weight rods with medium to fast action
  • Reel

    Quality reel with disc drag to match rod
  • Line

    A floating line works well in all conditions
  • Leader

    8 to 10 pound

King Salmon

Want to battle behemoth sized fish? Try sight casting to these “giant red missiles” in a small stream and you’ll experience Alaska’s biggest and strongest salmon species. And these battle-ready fish will definitely put your 10 weight rod to the test!

The king salmon in this watershed range from 10 to 40 pounds, with most fish averaging 20+ pounds. Big bright streamers placed right on the end of their nose usually does the trick. Heavily weighted flies, persistence, and/or sink-tip fly lines are very helpful, too.

  • Rod

    10 to 11 weight single handed rods with medium-fast to fast action
  • Reel

    Durable reels with strong disc drag and 200 yards of 30 pound backing
  • Line

    A floating line works well in most conditions. But bring one sink tip in the 10 to 15 foot range with a medium to fast sink rate.
  • Leader

    20 pound

Chum Salmon

We see strong numbers of chum salmon (a.k.a. “tiger salmon“) in this watershed and they consistently take a fly. These hard fighting fish have been overlooked by fly anglers for many years and now have a reputation for knuckle-pounding battles… and we’ve seen reels nearly spooled when these guys find heavy current. (We actually recovered an entire fly line, 4 hours later and a mile upstream, still attached to the chum salmon that broke it off!)

Also know as a “tiger salmon” for their eye-catching and unique red striping, catching these fish are sure to put a BIG smile on your face (and a burn in your bicep)!

Fish range from 6 – 15 pounds, average 8 – 10 pounds.

  • Rod

    7 to 8 weight rods with medium-fast to fast action
  • Reel

    Durable reels with medium to strong disc drag and 150 yards of 20 pound backing
  • Line

    A floating line works well in most conditions. One sink tip in the 5 to 15 foot range with a medium to fast sink rate can be helpful at times, but not mandatory.
  • Leader

    15 pound